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St Augustines Church Rugeley

Night & Day Time Vidual St Augustines Church Rugeley

These are just some of the daylight pictures of the Chancel St Augustines Church Rugeley.
a fantastic place so deep in history more to follow.

The former parish church of ST. AUGUSTINE consisted of nave, chancel, north aisle, north chapel, west tower, and south porch. After the completion of the present church in 1823 the old building was partly demolished. The chancel and the adjacent north chapel, under separate gabled roofs, were left standing and walled up on the west side. In 1957 they were still in use for a Sunday school and occasional services. The west tower was left in position, but the nave and aisle were demolished except for the arches of the arcade.

The oldest part of the remaining structure is the chancel which dates from the late 12th century. The south wall, which has a contemporary string course and a single-light window, is of this date. The window's pointed head may be a later replacement. The 12th-century nave was probably without aisles; the eastern respond and the most easterly pier of the arcade are circular on plan and represent an early13th-century reconstruction of the nave. The north chapel, of the same length as the chancel but slightly narrower, is an addition of the later 13th century. The east window consists of three graded lancets under a single head, and there is a flat contemporary buttress at the north-east angle. The chapel is divided from the chancel by an arcade which originally consisted of two bays. The remains of a single-light window, part of the earlier north wall of the chancel, are visible in the spandrel between the arches. The west respond and single pier of the arcade have engaged semicircular shafts with wide fillets. The bell capitals, undercut abaci, and doubleroll bases are typical of the period 1250–1300. Alterations to the chancel itself of about this time include a trefoil-headed piscina and a two-light window with original geometrical tracery. West of the piscina is a large niche with a trefoil head, presumably a single sedile. The walling which partially blocks the eastern arch of the arcade appears to date from the 14th century and was probably inserted to form a screen between the two altars, On the chapel side is a double piscina and an ogeeheaded recess. It seems probable that the floor level of the sanctuary was formerly higher and that this recess represents another single sedile. At the back of the recess is an oblique shaft cut through the masonry and communicating with a small ogee-headed opening on the west face of the wall. The wall and openings have been much restored, but if this feature is original it suggests a squint enabling a server to keep both chancel and chapel altars in view. The priest's door in the south wall of the chancel has a shouldered arch and may be of post-Reformation date. Near it is a roughly built pyramidal buttress. The head of a 15th- or 16th-century two-light window has been built into the 19th-century west wall of the chancel. This window was formerly immediately west of the priest's door. (fn. 50) In the north wall of the chapel are two post-Reformation windows, and the east window of the chancel was formerly of the 'churchwarden Gothic' type, having simple interlacing tracery


Except at its east end the nave arcade dates from the late 13th century and is similar to the arcade dividing chancel and chapel. It has a pointed arch at each end with two wide semicircular arches between them. The central arches are twice the width of the others, suggesting that two piers have been removed and that the arcade originally consisted of six equal bays. No traces of nave walls exist and burials have taken place within the area of the former nave. A short length of the west wall of the aisle, which includes the jamb of a large window, projects from the north-east angle of the tower. The tower itself is of the 14th century with boldly projecting angle buttresses and a later castellated parapet. The west face has a pointed doorway of two orders above which is a two-light 14th-century window. There are two-light openings in the belfry stage and single openings with ogee heads in the stage below. Above the tall 14th-century tower arch are the weather marks of the former nave roof, the pitch of the south slope having been altered three times. The buttress at the north-east corner is corbelled out above the level of the former aisle and bears a weather mark showing that the aisle had a gabled roof.
Drawings of the church (fn. 52) before its partial demolition show that the south nave wall continued in the same line as that of the chancel. The roof was also continuous and contained four dormer windows, three near the west end probably being used to light the gallery. Just east of the tower was a large porch with a pointed arch and angle buttresses. Between this and the chancel there are traces of two tall blocked arches, suggesting that there was formerly a short projecting aisle on the south side, the arcade having four bays and corresponding with what are now the two central arches of the north arcade. The character of the inserted windows suggests that the demolition of the aisle and the walling-up of the arcade took place in the 17th century.
Under the terms of the lease of the rectory in 1637 Walter Littleton was obliged to repair the chancel 'which will now necessarily cost him 20 nobles'. (fn. 53) The north chapel, which was almost certainly the site of the altar dedicated to Our Lady before the dissolution of the chantries, (fn. 54) was still known as 'Westons' Chancel' in the 18th century. (fn. 55) The church already had a west gallery by 1718, in which year a north gallery was added. (fn. 56) During the building of the new church in 1822 it was decided at a vestry meeting to keep the tower of the old church in repair at the expense of the parish. (fn. 57) The monuments in the body of the old church were moved to the north chapel. A restoration of what was left of the church took place between 1869 and 1872. (fn. 58) In 1883 stained glass was inserted in one of the chancel windows in memory of Louisa Frances and Francis Mary Levett. (fn. 59) The building had been 'restored and beautified' in 1891 by the addition of two stained glass windows, (fn. 60) one in memory of Ralph Armishaw (d. 1890) and the other, the east chancel window, in memory of the Revd. Robert Litler. The stone tracery of 'Decorated' type in the latter was probably inserted at the same time. The carved stone font, although of 15th-century design, probably also dates from the late 19th century. There are fragments of medieval glass in the lancet window of the chancel.
Monuments in the north chapel include an incised alabaster floor slab bearing part of a female figure and an incomplete inscription dated 1400. (fn. 61) A second figure has been obliterated by wear. There is also a stone slab with brasses bearing a single figure and inscribed to John Weston (d. 1566). (fn. 62) Wall tablets of Jacobean design with coats of arms commemorate Ralph Weston (d. 1605), partly illegible, and Richard Weston (d. 1613). Across the north-east corner is a massive marble tablet with typical carved ornament of c. 1700 to Thomas son of William Landor (d. 1670), Walter Landor (d. 1706), and Anna Landor (d. 1716). Other tablets commemorate Philip Weston (d. 1713), Elizabeth Landor (d. 1753), Joseph Landor and Mary his wife (the latter d. 1774), Robert Cotton (d. 1793), and Susanna his wife (d. 1810), Elizabeth Landor (d. 1814), Samuel Barnett (d. 1803), who established iron and tin works at King's Bromley (Offlow hundred), and the Revd. Edward R. Pitman (d. 1879), master of King Edward's School. Two 17th-century tablets to members of the Chetwynd family (1653–91), recorded c. 1836, were later removed to Grendon (Warws.). (fn. 63) In the churchyard the tomb of Elizabeth Coting (d. 1694) and of the wife of Edward Hollinhurst (d. 1696) bears an unusual slab carved with two shrouded figures. (fn. 64) Near the priest's door are the remains of a churchyard cross. Many of the stones in the churchyard wall are ancient and may represent material from the demolished church. In 1875 a new burial ground, a continuation of the old churchyard, was consecrated by the bishop
In or about 1818 it was decided that a new parish church was necessary owing to the increase in population. (fn. 66) A site east of the old church, large enough for a new burial ground, was given in 1819 by Viscount Anson. (fn. 67) The building, which is of stone in a simplified late Gothic style, was designed by C. Underwood. (fn. 68) It originally consisted of a rectangular nave of five bays with aisles and clerestory, a shallow chancel, and a tall west tower. (fn. 69) It was consecrated on 21 January 1823. (fn. 70) Internally the nave arcades have lofty shafted piers and four-centred arches, the aisles being occupied by north and south galleries. The base of the tower forms an entrance lobby, and there is a large gallery across the west end of the church.


NIGHT VIDUAL

The Parish Church of Brereton and Rugeley. St Augustine's is in the heart of Rugeley, and serves the community in its traditional building, which was built in 1822 AD.

in the church yard you will find graves of the notorious Dr Willam Palmers victims
a vidual was conducted by myself tina k and michelle c. enjoy the pictures and please do not be scared to give feed back...more pictures and audio sounds to come.

we had all types ofphenomenon happening from hearing breathing, feeling of depair anger, sickness.
voices, hearing of walking infront then behind Michelle C received a lot of feeling from the above list, i experienced severe back pains and being pushed.

also we went back in day light and experienced more phenomenon see next blog..
but i have to say this was the girls first vidual with me and i am so proud of them.... 



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Tressa Yeomans,
18 Sep 2010, 02:58
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Tressa Yeomans,
18 Sep 2010, 02:58
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Tressa Yeomans,
18 Sep 2010, 02:56
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Tressa Yeomans,
18 Sep 2010, 02:57
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